Parish of St. Vincent Ferrer and St. Catherine of Siena

A Parish of the Archdiocese of New York served by the Dominican Friars


October 14, 2017

St. Jude Novena – Pastor’s Reflection (October 15, 2017)

I write you these words about ten days before you read them, but from your vantage point surely will remember September’s horrendous parade of natural disasters. As you read this, millions of people across the Caribbean (3.5 million in Puerto Rico) and the Southern United States are starting all over again. Years ago they built homes and businesses from scratch now, with greater effort, they reconstruct them from out of a colossal mess.

Imagine too those impacted directly or indirectly by the shooting in Las Vegas. They too must build again, even though they can never build back what was.

Many of us sense a regression in our domestic and international political conversation. How do we recover the patterns of civility in affairs we once took for granted?

We have three hospitals in our parish and in each of these patients start over all the time: trying to recover capacities like walking, to which they once gave no thought.

Starting over is always harder, and demands an extra discipline and determination. Consider a domestic, personal example. We decide to get ourselves into shape and then illness or work breaks our new patterns of health. Then ours is the drudgery of making up lost ground. First, progress thrills us and gives rise to a hearty, “Hey, look at me.” Recovering carries the weight of disappointment, even embarrassment, at repeated effort. Stealthy temptations circle those who have lost ground and entice them away from the grunt work of regaining it. How many are the ways we can check out at such a point. Lost ground is despair’s fertile soil.

But faith teaches that this barren place of loss also harbors the seed of new life, waiting to be watered by prayer. After loss, what will give us the incentive to live again, or to pray that those we love will choose to live again? Perhaps it is the realization that rebuilding life means more than just gluing the old pieces back together. What we get back will not be the same: either it will be the battered shell of what was lost, or it will be the familiar transformed by new wisdom, new gratitude, and new humility.

Those who have come back from loss through faith tell us the story of grace. They realize in new ways the value of each day, each relationship, and each opportunity.

Tradition assigns to the Apostle, St. Jude Thaddeus patronage of those who find themselves at the bottom of life and who face the temptation not to start over. Our Dominican Shrine of St. Jude annually organizes nine days of common prayer for those seeking a renewal of hope. Such prayers ask for more than the restoration of the past, they seek the new thriving that actually derives profit from the experience of loss.

In these days when so many look to come fully alive again, the Shrine invites you to share your petitions for yourself or others who need to challenge a dead end with God’s gift of hope. Cards for these intentions will be placed at the statues of St. Jude in each church. You can return them to the church offices, or by leaving them in a basket at the shrines or the collection basket, or giving them to a Friar.

We will pray for your intentions during the days of our Novena from October 20 to October 28. The Novena prayers will be said at each of the Masses celebrated in our parish during these days. At two Masses each day there will be sermon preached for those making the Novena. The preached Masses will be at 1 pm at St. Catherine’s and at 6 pm at St. Vincent’s. On Sunday the preached Mass will be at 10 am at St. Catherine’s and 6 pm at St. Vincent’s. Several Friars will be assisting in the preaching of this novena, and each of them will address the of loss and recovery in the life of faith.

Please consider joining this work of prayer.

Peace!
Fr. Walter